Canadian director Ted Kotcheffs memoir dives into his Toronto roots and his

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement Facebook “I was blue and I could hardly breathe and my mother woke up and she saw me, this blue frozen piece of meat, and she screamed,” the 85-year-old raconteur recalled in a recent interview.His father, a marathon runner, ran 20 blocks to get a doctor while his uncle risked being arrested by chopping down two spruce trees and dragging them back for firewood.center_img Canadian writer-director Ted Kotcheff has racked up a wide variety of credits in his long career, from The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz to First Blood and Weekend at Bernie’s.He’s directed many Hollywood heavyweights, including Gregory Peck, William Shatner, Ingrid Bergman and Gene Hackman, and developed a close friendship and working relationship with the late acclaimed author Mordecai Richler.Most recently he’s been an executive producer for hundreds of episodes of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, one of the longest-running TV shows ever. Login/Register With: All this from the most humble of beginnings in Toronto’s Cabbagetown neighbourhood during the Great Depression, Kotcheff writes in his candid new memoir Director’s Cut: My Life in Film, when his Bulgarian dad and Macedonian mom were so poor they couldn’t afford coal or wood to heat their home.One winter night, when temperatures dipped to around -40 C, a nearly 2-year-old Kotcheff almost froze to death. Twitterlast_img

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