Stephen Hawking Humans will die out within 1000 years unless we leave

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “The fact that we humans who are ourselves mere collections of fundamental particles of nature have been able to come so close to understanding the laws that are governing us and our universe is a great achievement.” Earlier this year Professor Hawking helped unveil the Virgin’s Galactic SpaceShipTwo, saying at the launch: “I have had ALS for over 50 years now and, while I have no fear of adventure, others do not always take the same view. If I am able to go – and if Richard will still take me, I would be very proud to fly on this spaceship.”In Oxford this week he described the current day to be a “glorious time to be alive and doing research in theoretical physics.”Our picture of the universe has changed a great deal in the last 50 years and I am happy if I have made a small contribution. Professor Stephen Hawking has warned that mankind will not survive another millenia unless it makes a home beyond Earth’s atmosphere.The celebrated physicist was addressing a lecture audience at the Oxford Union debating society on Monday evening when he gave the stark warning.”Most recent advances in cosmology have been achieved from space where there are uninterrupted views of our Universe,” he said “but we must also continue to go into space for the future of humanity.”I don’t think we will survive another 1,000 years without escaping our fragile planet. “I therefore want to encourage public interest in space, and I have been getting my training in early.”center_img Show more Concluding, he told the audience: “Remember to look up to the stars and not down at your feet.”Try to make sense of what you see and wonder about what makes the universe exist.”Be curious and however life may seem there’s always something you can do and succeed at – it matters that you don’t just give up.”last_img read more

Showjumper rode over retired policewoman after being knocked out of competition

first_imgA showjumper has admitting trampling on a retired policewoman on horseback after wrongly accusing her of filming an equestrian event she had been competing in on her mobile phone.Amy Ridler, 20, of Cherrywood Crescent, Solihull, confessed to assaulting Jillian Williams whilst her ten-year-old daughter watched in horror at a competition held at the UK equestrian centre in Grantham last April.Pleading guilty at Lincoln Magistrates, the court heard how Ridler, 20, had charged at Mrs Williams, grabbing her by the hair and dragging her across the arena floor, before coaxing her horse towards her in an attempt to trample on her again. After being knocked unconscious, Mrs Williams claimed that Ridler attempted to steer the horse over her motionless body before being dragged from the animal by a group of spectators.Although heavily bruised from the attack, the mother-of-one escaped with only minor injuries.Ridler was fined fined £250, ordered to pay £300 in compensation and handed a restraining order prohibiting her from communicating with Mrs Williams until January 2019.A spokeswoman for British Showjumping confirmed that the governing body was aware of the incident and had  begun disciplinary procedures against Ridler. Amy Ridler, from Solihull, West Midlands, pleaded guilty Ridler was fined £250 Mrs Williams, 50, a former dog handler for Sussex Police, described how Ridler had mistakenly accused her of filming the competition, only to then ride her down when she tried to escape.“I’d forgotten to cancel my dog walker that day, so I was trying to text him while watching Amy showjump,” she said.“The sun was in my eyes and I couldn’t see, so I was waving my phone all over the place. She saw me standing there with my phone and thought I was filming her, and went mad.“She was shouting at her mum, who was nearby, to ‘get that f***ing phone off her’; she was shouting and swearing and saying she was going to run me down as she rode her horse at me.” Ridler was fined £250Credit:Caters News Agencycenter_img Mrs Williams, who is the district commissioner of Brocklesby Hunt Pony Club, described how Ridler had then pinned her against the arena’s side railing as she lifted her up by her hair.“I kept really calm but then she pushed me into the railing. I was squashed against it and I raised my arm to try and push the horse off me.“Next thing I know, I felt this incredible pain on my head and she clawed my head and picked me up. She then dragged me along the floor under the pony and I was trampled on.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Amy Ridler, from Solihull, West Midlands, pleaded guiltyCredit:Caters News Agency I kept really calm but then she pushed me into the railing. I was squashed against it and I raised my arm to try and push the horse off meJill Williamslast_img read more

Divorced parents who pit children against former partners guilty of abuse

first_imgDivorced parents who “brainwash” their children against ex-partners are guilty of “abuse”, the head of the agency that looks after youngsters’ interests in family courts has said.Anthony Douglas, chief executive of the Children and Family Court Advisory and Support Service (Cafcass), warned against the danger of “parental alienation”.He said the deliberate manipulation of a child by one parent against the other has become so common in family breakdowns that it should be dealt with like any other form of neglect or child abuse.According to Cafcass, parental alienation is responsible for around 80 per cent of the most difficult cases that come before the family courts.   Alienation can include a parent constantly badmouthing or belittling the other adult, limiting contact between the child and the targeted parent, forbidding discussion about them, creating the impression the parent does not love the child and forcing the child to reject the parent.“It’s undoubtedly a form of neglect or child abuse in terms of the impact it can have,” said Mr Douglas. “I think the way you treat your children after a relationship has broken up is just as powerful a public health issue as smoking or drinking.”One mother, who wants to remain unnamed, described how she was cut off from her son two years ago by her ex-husband.She said her former partner made “false and fabricated allegations” against her in order to gain custody and “manipulate my son so deeply that he now has no memory of his loving childhood with me”.Now her contact with the 14-year-old is limited to Skype conversations and visits once a month.“If I had been sent to prison I would have been able to see my son more than I do now,” she said. “My son is brainwashed – he is emotionally dependent on his father and behaves as if he were in a cult. My son has no idea what is going on, only that he feels angry at me.“The more parents who stand up to this and say it is unacceptable the better. Emotional abuse is just as horrible and controlling as physical abuse. It’s unacceptable and things need to change in the way it is dealt with.”  In some countries, governments have put in place legislation to prevent such behaviour. In Italy parents can be fined, whereas in Mexico, guilty adults can be given a 15-year jail term.And in America “parenting coordinators” are ordered and supervised by the courts to help restore relationships between parents and children identified as “alienated”. I think the way you treat your children after a relationship has broken up is just as powerful a public health issue as smoking or drinkingAnthony Douglas, Cafcass Mr Douglas said: “There isn’t a specific criminal law that outlaws parental alienation in the UK. But we do have family law and through assessments and enforcement proceedings, we do have the ability to send parents to prison or give them community sentences.”But this is hardly ever the case because ultimately the punishment on the parent will rebound on the child.”However, judges in the UK are starting to recognise parental alienation, which is leading to some children being removed from the offending parent.“But this is fraught with difficulty,” said Mr Douglas. “It’s a rocky road and a difficult process.”Joanna Abrahams, head of family law at Setfords Solicitors, is one of the country’s few specialists in parental alienation.She said: “The amount of enquiries we are getting about this type of behaviour is growing all the time. At the moment we get about three calls a day about this – and that’s a lot.“It’s always been there but people are now beginning to understand more about it and how harmful it can be. You can run into the tens of thousands on cases like these.“The frustration when you can’t see your child takes over people’s entire lives. Some kind of legislation needs to be put in place but what that is I can’t say.“Each case is of course very different and it’s not always that someone is doing this on purpose. It might be subconscious behaviour.”center_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Ms Abrahams is looking to draw up a team of experts to see if a committee could be formulated to tackle parental alienation.“It’s in the embryonic stages at the moment but it would include myself, Cafcass social workers and mental health workers – a cross-range of experts with the hope of developing something.“I think we need to all work together to have a more joined-up approach to this behaviour which can be so damaging.”last_img read more

The bizarre price war cutting the cost of flights to Britains most

first_imgBarra’s airport is famous for its beach runwayCredit:GETTY £125inc. tax Ballintaggart FarmGrandtully, Perth and Kinross, Scotland Check availability Reaching the Hebrides by air has never been cheaper A spokesman for Comhairle nan Eilean Siar, the Outer Hebrides’ council, said it was seeking talks with all the airlines “to develop a clearer picture of what the announcement may mean for the longer-term sustainability of air services to the Western Isles”.Cameron Taylor, executive director of the Orkney Tourism Group, also welcomed more flights and lower fares but cautioned: “It is important for the air service to be sustainable and stable, and we would not wish commercial rivalries to create instability or uncertainty.”In Shetland, local tour operators hope the news might spark a tourism revival. Visitor numbers have declined in recent years, almost entirely because demand from the oil industry for staff accommodation has made it difficult for visitors to find a bed for the night.   Rock HouseEdinburgh, Scotland Loganair flies routes on behalf of Flybe from Scottish mainland airports, such as the Glasgow-Barra route which involves the famous beach landing on Tràigh Mhòr, along with services to Benbecula, Stornoway, Sumburgh and Kirkwall. The airlines’ managing director Jonathan Hinkles said the company “was extremely disappointed and surprised” at Flybe’s decision to split with it. Loganair says it will continue its routes and is adding additional Glasgow-Barra flights in peak season – in effect it is going head to head with its former partner – and larger aircraft on some Glasgow-Benbecula flights. The airline is also seeking a codeshare with Flybe, whose CEO Christine Ourmieres-Widener said the new agreement is a chance to offer “more choices and competitive pricing” in the region. £455inc. tax It’s so good you’ll want to keep this glorious Highland gastronomic hideaway a secret. Take a coo…Read expert review From £70inc. tax The best hotels in scotlandview all Rates provided byBooking.com 9Telegraph expert rating Inverlochy Castle HotelFort William, Highlands, Scotlandcenter_img From Under current arrangements passengers flying into Scotland on Flybe and onto the islands do not need to collect their bags and check in again for the connecting flights. Loganair says that baggage charges imposed by Flybe/Eastern Airways will erode any savings from cheaper tickets.The Barra route has been the subject of local criticism for regular delays due to routine maintenance while Flybe has also faced criticism over customer care. Similarly lower fares have been announced for the new alliance’s routes to Sumburgh on Shetland and to Kirkwall on Orkney.Ian Fordham, chairman of Outer Hebrides Tourism, welcomed the news, saying he hoped the “affordable” fares would lead to an increase in the number of visitors. “We hope the affordable fares will encourage more people to take a break in the islands, especially out of the main season and experience our unique landscape and culture,” he said. A heavenly 18th-century house hidden on Calton Hill with a courtyard garden to the front, a prett…Read expert review 9Telegraph expert rating The haunting stones of Callanish on LewisCredit:GETTY Around 218,000 people visit the Outer Hebrides a year, the vast majority – 80 per cent – by ferry. High airfares have meant that flights tend to be dominated by businesses on expense accounts. “The popularity of the Outer Hebrides has been growing dramatically over the past few years, and ferry capacity has been unable to cope at peak times,” said Fordham.The alliance between Flybe and Eastern Airways begins in September and follows a falling out between Flybe and Loganair, whose current franchise arrangement will stop at the end of August. Eastern Airways already flies the Aberdeen-Stornoway route. The haunting stones of Callanish on Lewis Barra's airport is famous for its beach runway Queen Victoria said she ‘never saw a lovelier or more romantic spot’ than Inverlochy Castle in 18…Read expert review A price war has broken out between airlines covering some of Scotland’s most remote islands, slashing the cost of flights between the mainland and the Hebrides.One-way fares between Glasgow and Stornoway on Lewis typically top £300 in high season, making the 60-minute journey one of the most expensive routes per mile in the world – but are now on sale for just £50 with Flybe and Eastern Airways, which have agreed an alliance and codeshare arrangement. 9Telegraph expert rating From Reaching the Hebrides by air has never been cheaperCredit:Credit: ScotImage / Alamy Stock Photo/ScotImage / Alamy Stock Photolast_img read more

Gary Lineker says it is a disgrace Chris Evans is paid more

first_imgThis whole BBC salary exposure business is an absolute outrage…I mean how can @achrisevans be on more than me?— Gary Lineker (@GaryLineker) July 19, 2017 The BBC has been forced to make public the names of 96 presenters and actors who earn over £150,000.While John Humphrys earns £600,000-£649,999, his Radio 4 Today colleague Sarah Montague does not make the list at all.Emily Maitlis of Newsnight, Louise Minchin of BBC Breakfast and the Radio 4 Woman’s Hour presenters Jenni Murray and Jane Garvey are also absent, yet men who do similar jobs are revealed to have larger salaries.Of the 96 names, only 34 are women – the majority in the lower salary bands. Happy BBC salary day. I blame my agent and the other TV channels that pay more. Now where did I put my tin helmet?— Gary Lineker (@GaryLineker) July 19, 2017 Previously, Mr Lineker told critics to blame his agent and the salary rates of other TV channels for the amount he is paid.Mr Lineker wrote: “Happy BBC salary day. I blame my agent and the other TV channels that pay more. Now where did I put my tin helmet?” Claudia Winkleman is the only woman in the top 10 highest-earners, according to salary details published today which lay bare a glaring gender pay gap. Lord Sugar, who presents The Apprentice on the BBC, sprung to Mr Lineker’s aid.He said: “You should not worry. You are in a market where presenters are paid at going rates ITV CH 4 pay more than the BBC. You have shown loyalty”. You should not worry. You are in a market where presenters are paid at going rates ITV CH 4 pay more than the BBC. You have shown loyalty https://t.co/BY54MsR1kj— Lord Sugar (@Lord_Sugar) July 19, 2017 Television presenter Gary Lineker has tweeted that he thinks it is a “disgrace” that Chris Evans is paid more than him.Mr Lineker, who is paid £1,750,000-£1,799,999 for his work with the BBC and is the broadcaster’s second-best paid star, said: “This whole BBC salary exposure business is an absolute outrage…I mean how can @achrisevans be on more than me?”Chris Evans is the BBC’s best-paid on the list, which doesn’t include those paid through production companies.He takes in £2,200,000-£2,249,999 per year for his work with the broadcaster. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Man charged over hitandrun death of keen cyclist who had recently ridden

first_imgVicky Myres and partner James Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. He will appear at Manchester and Salford Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday.A second man arrested after the crash, aged 35, was released under investigation. Vicky Myres and partner JamesCredit:PAcenter_img Her family have said her death leaves a void that can never be filled.The florist, from Flixton, had just bought a house with partner James and recently cycled from Land’s End to John O’Groats.The “lovely daughter” leaves behind parents and grandparents as well as a brother and sister, a family statement said.It read: “Her life was perfect, she lived it to the full and, together with her devoted partner James, they were planning longer and more exotic trips.”It’s easy to say your daughter is lovely but she was, both inside and out. “It has left a void that we cannot see being filled, ever.”She had everything to live for…”Singh has been charged with causing death by dangerous driving, failing to stop after a road traffic collision and failing to report a road traffic collision. A man has been charged over the death of a young cyclist killed in a hit-and-run in Greater Manchester.Vicky Myres, 24, who had recently cycled from Land’s End to John O’Groats, was struck by a car in Timperley, Greater Manchester, early on Sunday morning.Emergency services were called to Stockport Road just before 8am but Miss Myers later died in hospital.Gurparthab Ajay Singh, 26, of Hall Lane, Wythenshawe, is accused of fatally colliding with the 24-year-old.last_img read more

Vegetarians are eating meat and coeliacs are having gluten because of poor

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Following the news, bakery chain Greggs is now planning to “ramp up” its labelling efforts after its chief executive, Roger Whiteside, said the company was fully aware of the extent of allergy risks. He added that he wanted to ensure that Greggs didn’t follow in the footsteps of Pret.Commenting on the findings, Dominika Piasecka, spokesperson for The Vegan Society, said: “With so many new and exciting vegan products hitting the market, clear labelling is becoming increasingly important but we find this isn’t always practised. They found that although a lot of crisps, like Pringles and McCoys, contain milk powder in the seasoning, 16% of people still think all crisps are vegan.The findings follow Pret’s announcement last week that it would introduce full ingredient labelling to product packaging, even for food made freshly in its kitchens.Pret’s changes came after the inquest into the death of 15-year-old Natasha Ednan-Laperouse who collapsed on a flight due to anaphylactic shock after she at a Pret sandwich containing sesame.The coroner found that she was “reassured” by the lack of allergen information on the packaging and declared the chain’s allergy labelling as inadequate.This week, it was revealed that another Pret customer, Celia Marsh, died in December 2017 after eating the chain’s “super-veg rainbow flatbread”, which was meant to be dairy-free. A quarter of vegetarians and vegans have accidentally eaten meat due to unclear food labelling, the Telegraph can reveal.New research by Opinium for Ubamarket reveals that 40% of the nation don’t understand what they eat and 30% struggle to manage their diet as a result.Among the findings, the survey showed that 32% of people were not aware that pesto is not vegetarian and an overwhelming 81% also thought that soy sauce was gluten free.The confusion is the result of poor labelling.–– ADVERTISEMENT ––It calls overall food safety into question as 52% of respondents agreed that the complex nature of UK labels makes it difficult for people with dietary requirements to make informed decisions about their food.This includes those following vegetarian, vegan, dairy free and gluten free diets.Hazel Gowland, expert in food risks and founder of Allergy Action found this particularly disturbing. She said: “By law, consumers buying food must not be misled. People selling food have to ensure it is safe this includes the obligation to present and provide accurate information about it.”Information which is inaccurate, incomplete or poorly communicated is a real safety risk to those with food allergies, intolerances and coeliac disease.” The survey asked a representative sample of 2,003 UK voters questions about the transparency of food labelling as well as specific products. Natasha Ednan-Laperouse died after ate a Pret A Manger sandwich. The chain is now introducing stricter labelling. “Mistakenly consuming animal products does occasionally happen among vegans because they misread labels, get confused with some of the unfamiliar ingredients, or a product is mislabelled.“Our Vegan Trademark aims to help consumers decide that a product is suitable at a glimpse and we encourage companies to improve their vegan labelling.”Ubamarket, which commissioned the research, is launching a new Allergen Alerts feature as part of its app. Natasha Ednan-Laperouse died after ate a Pret A Manger sandwich. The chain is now introducing stricter labelling.Credit:PA read more

Oxford students accused of hypocrisy after alarming lack of prominent BAME figures

Earlier this year, the Oxford student activist group Common Ground held an event titled “Decolonising the History curriculum”.The event, publicised on the History Faculty’s website, was part of a symposium which included a “de-colonial tour” of the Pitt Rivers museum.    Professors said that they had hoped students would use this question to discuss the legacy of Britons from black and ethnic backgrounds.    Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Oxford University has previously refused to give into calls from the “Rhodes Must Fall” campaign to tear down a statue of Cecil Rhodes But they noted:  “There were no BAME actors. No Meera Syal, no Lenny Henry (whose career has seen remarkable change), no Idris Elba.“A similar point can be made about art and literature. No mention of Benjamin Zephaniah or Chris Ofili (or again Steve McQueen) , no mention of Zadie Smith, Hanif Kureishi, Andrea Levy (all best sellers, all adapted for prime time television) or Monica Ali.“Popular music in these essays was invisible but it was implied it had stopped somewhere around Tommy Steele. No Reggae, no Two-Tone, no Northern Soul, no Bhangra influences, no Grime.”Examiners acknowledge that the students who are the most conscious about decolonising the curriculum may not have taken this particular paper. They say that students might object “but this wasn’t in the reading” or “this wasn’t in the lectures”, which they say is “not unfair”, but add that none of the information is hard to find.Academics also complained that a question about protectionism before and after the Wall Street Crash “inadvertently and worryingly” revealed that many history undergraduates “don’t seem to understand what the word ‘protectionism’ means”.Professors have previously used examiner reports to lament students’ “basic common sense” in essays, adding that some found it “difficult to express their thoughts in writing” and spoke as if they were a “bloke down the pub”. Oxford dons bemoaned the lack of discussion of prominent BAME Britons such as Idris Elba Oxford dons bemoaned the lack of discussion of prominent BAME Britons such as Idris Elba Oxford history students have been accused of hypocrisy after they largely failed to mention any prominent black figures in their essays on post-colonialism, despite protests over Rhodes Must Fall.Professors complained that “we are supposedly in the midst of a consciousness raising era as exemplified by Rhodes Must Fall”, yet students barely mentioned anyone from Black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) backgrounds.History dons noted that the most popular exam question last year was “How useful is the term post-colonial in understanding Britain since 1947?” but scripts were “almost universally devoid of First Class quality”.The lack of BAME figures in the essays was “downright alarming”, according to the examiner reports. Professors said that students were preoccupied with the “decolonisation” narrative, and there was little discussions about how immigrants have shaped life in modern Britain.–– ADVERTISEMENT ––Oxford University has previously refused to give into calls from the “Rhodes Must Fall” campaign to tear down a statue of Cecil Rhodes from Oriel College over his links with Britain’s colonial past.In recent years, Oxford students have become increasingly vocal about the need to “decolonise” curriculum so that it is less dominated by western, white men, and includes more female and BAME figures.   Oxford University has previously refused to give into calls from the “Rhodes Must Fall” campaign to tear down a statue of Cecil Rhodes read more

Explosive device found at Glasgow University linked to packages at three sites

glasgow uni glasgow uni The university said minor restrictions were still in place while the mail room would remain closed. All other buildings reopened late yesterday afternoon.A spokesman added: “We apologise to all staff and students who have suffered disruption and thank everyone for their patience and understanding as police dealt with this incident.”Counter-terror police south of the border are still working to identify a motive or suspect over the explosive packages sent to offices at Heathrow Airport, City Airport and Waterloo Station, which were posted with Irish stamps and had Dublin as the return address. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Counter-terrorism police are investigating a suspicious package sent to Glasgow University after it was linked with improvised explosive devices sent to three major London transport hubs.Police Scotland and the Metropolitan Police are now working together on the inquiry after a controlled explosion was carried out in Scotland’s biggest city on Wednesday.The package was detected the day after devices posted with Irish stamps were received in London, prompting an investigation by counter-terrorism police into a possible Irish dissident plot.Assistant Chief Constable Steve Johnson said: “There are similarities in the package, its markings and the type of device that was recovered in Glasgow to those in London.“Therefore, we are now treating it as being linked to the three packages being investigated by the Met in London and both investigations are being run in tandem.”Our enquiries into the Glasgow package are at an early stage but there is no ongoing risk to the public.” A suspicious package was found in the mail roomCredit:SWNS A controlled explosion was carried out after university buildings were evacuatedCredit:PA Mr Johnson said the package in Glasgow was identified by “alert staff at the university mail room who had received protective security information” advising them to report suspicious packages.He added: “The same advice has already been sent to a range of businesses, including transport hubs and mail sorting companies, and will now also be sent to those in the education sector.” Police confirmed a “device” was found in the package on the main campus, but said it was not opened and no-one was hurt in the incident, which caused major disruption to the university and on roads in the west end of Glasgow.Staff and students were asked to evacuate several buildings shortly before 11am, with classes cancelled for the rest of the day. Nearby roads were closed for several hours during the incident.One student tweeted during the incident: “Just been evacuated from the med school due to a suspicious package getting told to move to byres road, loads of police, fire engines and all cordoned off now!”Scary stuff, guy just came shouting we needed to evacuate as suspicious package found then the police were shouting at us to move away from the building!” read more

Suzy Lamplugh may have used Mr Kipper as a cover story

The police investigation centred on identifying this mystery man and in 2002 Scotland Yard named convicted rapist and killer John Cannan as the key suspect. In her office diary she recorded details of a lunchtime appointment with a ‘Mr Kipper’, at a property in Shorrolds Road. The 33-year hunt for missing estate agent Suzy Lamplugh has taken a startling twist, with a former detective claiming to have unearthed compelling new evidence contradicting the theory that she had ever arranged to meet the mysterious ‘Mr Kipper’. Miss Lamplugh, 25, disappeared in July 1986 after apparently arranging to show a client around a house that was for sale in Fulham, west London. Last November they even began… read more