Corning boys basketball team moves to 18-0

first_imgCorning >> For the first time in more than a decade, the Corning High boys basketball team welcomed Paradise to town for a league contest. Friday’s winter homecoming game kicked off Westside League play between Paradise and Corning. Corning won round one, 60-41, to stay unbeaten at 18-0 and 3-0 in WSL play. Paradise dropped to 7-10, 1-2. Corning, off to its best start since third-year coach Kurt Wilkins grabbed the reigns of the program, received a game-high 24 points from top scorer Noah …last_img read more

The Bulldogs girls struggle to come back in a 71-44 loss against Etna

first_imgLos MOlinos >> Despite coming back strong in the second half, the Bulldogs couldn’t quite catch up to Etna, ending the game with a 71-44 loss.Los Molinos fell behind early, only scoring 4 points in the first quarter, two free throws by Rachel Rogers and a basket by Yaneli Castellon, as Etna rocketed to a 20-4 lead. The Bulldogs turned it up in the second but still had a way to go before catching up to Etna, which still led 39-23. Rogers scored 14 in the second quarter including two 3s. …last_img read more

Cosmologists in Search of Dark Ghosts

first_imgDark matter and dark energy: do they exist?  Cosmologists and physicists are spending large amounts of money building huge and expensive detectors to find them, but so far have found nothing.  This raises profound questions about the limits of science, the interaction of observation with theory, the presuppositions behind scientific models, and the sociology of the scientific community.  The universe, clearly, owes no obligation to scientific models; it is what it is.  If scientists were to pursue a false path in their search for understanding, how long could they be wrong?  For a thousand years?    Two articles in Nature explored the search for dark stuff.  Jenny Hogan wrote about the search for dark matter,1 and Geoff Brumfiel wrote about the search for dark energy.2  In short, the dark matter search seems more promising than the dark energy search.  “Jenny Hogan reports that attempts to identify the mysterious dark matter are on the verge of success,” The heading before the two articles reads.  “In the second, Geoff Brumfiel asks why dark energy, hailed as a breakthrough when discovered a decade ago, is proving more frustrating than ever to the scientists who study it.”    Yet even Hogan’s dark-matter article contains some disturbing revelations.  After describing large tanks of xenon and argon deep in European and American tunnels that hope to feel the bumps of passing dark matter particles, and the race to be the first scientist to detect them, she admitted, “Despite the enthusiasm, there is still a chance that nature will refuse to cooperate, and the experiments will chase ever better limits but never detect a particle.”  Some of the feverish activity behind the search has the feel of a snipe hunt or ghostbusters escapade. No one knows what dark matter is, but they know what it’s not.  It’s not part of the ’standard model’ of physics that weaves together everything that is known about ordinary matter and its interactions.  The standard model has been hugely successful, but it also has some problems, and in trying to fix these, theorists have predicted hordes of new fundamental particles.  At first, these hypothetical particles were viewed as unwelcome additions, but now some of them are leading candidates for dark matter.  “These days a theory without a dark-matter candidate is not considered an interesting one,” says [Leszek] Roszkowski [CERN].  “The existence of the dark-matter problem is perhaps the most convincing evidence for physics beyond the standard model.”Could it be that the community of physicists has jumped on a fast-moving bandwagon going nowhere?  They give names to theoretical entities: neutralinos, gravitinos, axions, and other things with exotic names, which might not even exist.  The scientists talk about weakly-interacting massive particles, or WIMPs, and tell us that 10 billion of them pass through every square meter of the Earth every second – yet no instrument, no matter how sensitive, has ever detected one.  Even the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, going into operation next year, will not be able to detect their presence with certainty: “Because such evidence is indirect, finding a WIMP signature at the LHC would not confirm it to be dark matter,” Hogan acknowledged.    Why, then, do theoretical physicists and cosmologists believe they exist?  Part of the reason comes from observations dating from the 1930s that galaxy clusters seem too loosely bound gravitationally to keep from flying apart over billions of years.  The belief also stems from physical theories about the nature of gravity and fundamental particles.  Having elegant models and expensive instrumentation, however, cannot legitimize a belief that fails observational confirmation.  But even if observations find a ghostly particle, don’t expect that there is only one kind of ghost.  Hogan ended with this escape clause for the theorists:Dark matter might prove to be a richer problem than anyone is expecting.  [Max] Tegmark [MIT] hopes for this outcome.  “This could be a wonderful surprise.  It’s very arrogant of us humans to say that just because we can’t see it, there’s only one kind of dark matter.”Critics might see this as job security for people with vivid imaginations.  And that was the good news.  Searchers for dark energy have even bigger problems.    Geoff Brumfiel’s article contains a strange mix of observation and theory.  It is commonly reported that the universe is flying apart faster than cosmologists expected from the normal expansion of the universe – but that presupposes acceptance of inflationary big-bang cosmology.  Inflation was invented to solve the flatness problem.  Our universe is finely balanced between its density and expansion rate.  Explaining this degree of fine tuning naturally has been a challenge for cosmologists for decades.  Inflation seemed to solve it by positing a rapid, exponential expansion in the early stages of the big bang.  Brumfiel wrote, “the expansion provided a way out of a theoretical impasse.  Observations of the Big Bang’s afterglow made by various groups, including Bennett’s, indicated that the Universe’s gravity had flattened it out.”    As happens so often in science, a solution breeds new problems.  There didn’t seem to be enough matter to have this effect on space-time.  Enter dark energy: “it turned out that the amount of energy needed to drive the acceleration was pretty close to that needed to solve the flatness problem by means of its gravity,” he wrote.  This created initial excitement in 1998 when evidence for an accelerating universe was announced.  Dark energy, he said, seemed “poised to provide great insight into the origin and future of the cosmos.”  Those hopes have been replaced by bigger problems:But a decade further on, researchers seem to have swapped one theoretical conundrum for a bigger one.  Follow-up measurements have revealed little about the nature of dark energy, and theories to explain it have failed to gain traction.  And although astronomers are trudging forwards with a battery of new measurements, there is little guarantee that any will solve the problem – and thus no clear consensus on how much effort to put into them.  “The issue is: how much information do we get from these future observations?” asks Avi Loeb, an astrophysicist at Harvard University.The fine-tuning of the expansion has caused some, like Leonard Susskind (Stanford), to propose a nearly infinite “multiverse” in which our universe’s vacuum energy is just right to allow for stars and planets and life (see 12/18/2005, 01/04/2006, 08/11/2006).  While others dislike the anthropic implications of this view, nothing better has been proposed that does not create more problems than it purports to solve:This sort of anthropic argument irks many scientists.  Critics say such reasoning is almost impossible to verify and doesn’t provide any deeper insight into the cosmos.  “Anthropics and randomness don’t explain anything,” says Paul Steinhardt, a theorist at Princeton University in New Jersey.  “I’m disappointed with what most theorists are willing to accept.”    The trouble is that no other approaches are proving any more fruitful.  Some suggest that the problem lies with Einstein’s idea of gravity, which they then seek to modify in a way that fits in with dark energy.  “It would be very fortunate if the dark energy were a modification of gravity,” says Georgi Dvali of New York University, “because it would address fundamental questions of physics.“ But others see little mileage in such changes.  Leaving aside the cosmos, “it’s not so easy to get those theories to be consistent with our Solar System”, says [Michael] Turner [U of Chicago]…..    In general, the theoretical side of the debate is not a pretty thing.  “We’ve tried a whole bunch of things and nothing has sprung forward,” says Sean Carroll, a theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.So how far can a cosmologist go before admitting defeat?  As far as he wants.  Secular cosmologists never want to give up and just say that “things are as they are because they were as they were,” as Thomas Gold once joked.  The search for ultimate answers is part of the game.  So the observationalists will continue to build huge detectors, trying to sharpen measurements that might nail down the ‘equation of state’ of the universe to finer degrees of precision, while the theoreticians, arguing that observations can only describe but not explain, will continue to theorize exotic particles.  When the particle zoo gets too cumbersome again, a new, more fundamental theory will be erected with smaller, more abstruse building blocks.    No matter how frustrating or hopeless, no matter how far off course, the show must go on: this is the game of secular science.  Being right is no fun.  Exasperation is the angst that propels the game onward, right or wrong.  Here is how Brumfiel ended his article:For now, many in the field are left with a sense of unease: the tantalizing clue they thought they had discovered has turned into an exasperating mystery.  And with no clear explanation of something that could be up to three-quarters of everything out there, it’s hard not to feel like you’re missing a big part of the picture, Susskind says.  “We could be wrong about cosmology for the next thousand years. Deeply wrong.”1Jenny Hogan, “Unseen Universe: Welcome to the dark side,” Nature 448, 240-245 (19 July 2007) | doi:10.1038/448240.2Geoff Brumfiel, “Unseen Universe: A constant problem,” Nature 448, 245-248 (19 July 2007) | doi:10.1038/448245a.They can’t even figure out our nearest star (the sun) and they want to tell us about the ultimate origins and fate of the universe – and even of multiple universes that would be beyond observation even if they existed.  What unconscionable arrogance.    You know what the whole problem is?  These people refuse, by choice (not because of the evidence), to acknowledge God in their thinking.  Searching for answers is a noble undertaking, but if you throw away the key before you start, no one should feel sorry for you when you get lost.    The secular cosmology community will not acknowledge the Creator despite being dragged kicking and screaming to the anthropic principle (08/11/2006, 05/11/2006).  They are determined to work out solutions to the universe by themselves, without recourse to the key to the problem.  They have made this choice a priori, before even looking through a telescope or at the output of a particle accelerator.  Materialism is so engrained, it has become an addiction.  The pain of withdrawal now is unthinkable.  A thousand years of being deeply wrong is preferable to kicking the habit.  This is your tax dollars at work: keeping an elite community hooked on a fruitless addiction. You can almost hear the irate comeback: “Well, what would you do?  Dismantle all this equipment and just say God did it?”  Of course not.  First of all, though, it should be clear that open-ended searches for ghosts is not good scientific practice, nor is spending a thousand years being deeply wrong.  Hopefully we can also agree that the public cannot be expected to pay for any and all quixotic pursuits scientists dream up.    The LHC and other megascience projects employ many thousands of people, and require many bright, highly-trained PhDs to design and operate.  This alone, however, is not a justification.  One could just as well imagine building parallel-universe detectors – or fairy detectors.  Would job security for thousands justify such expenditures?  How about a megaproject to dig a big hole, then fill it in again?  We must think rightly about the uses of technology and the expected payback to the people who pay for it.  There has to be some relationship between the investment and the expectation of success.    There is value in pure research.  A Murphyism states, “When you are investigating the unknown, you do not know what you will find.”  Perhaps some useful fact will come out of dark-matter detectors that will improve our lives.  If the goal is only to keep scientists busy, though, or to rationalize a materialistic philosophy, then the proponents should engage their hobbies on their own time and dime.    So what do we do with the LHC and the dark-matter detectors, the WMAPs and other such projects?  We change the presuppositions.  We start with the presupposition that there is a Creator who has revealed Himself in His creation.  This is the presupposition that motivated the great founders of science.  Our efforts, then, are directed once again at “thinking God’s thoughts after Him” to understand how He ordered the world and the universe and life.  And, as Francis Bacon admonished, we gear our efforts for the betterment of mankind.  These two goals can justify large expenditures on elaborate projects.  This is a far cry from today’s elitist mindset that misuses science to eliminate all thoughts of God and thinks the public should give scientists anything they want just because they are curious about the latest unverifiable, materialist fad.How ironic that the secularists should end up in quixotic pursuits after imaginary entities.  Their refusal to admit in their thinking a Holy Ghost who hovered over the surface of the waters at Creation did not free them from the need for ghosts.  They had to invent their own so that they could search endlessly for them.  What else can a soul do to alleviate the pain of denying its own existence?(Visited 23 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South Africa condemns Garissa massacre

first_img7 April 2015The South African government has condemned “in the strongest possible terms” the “barbaric and cowardly” terrorist attack at Garissa University College in Kenya last week, in which 148 people were killed.Somali militant group Al Shabab, a multi-ethnic group based in Somalia with links to Al- Qaeda, claimed responsibility for Thursday’s attack. The gunmen took more than 700 people hostage, before killing 148 people and injuring 79 or more.It is Kenya’s deadliest attack since the 1998 US embassy bombings in Nairobi, where more than 200 people died. Garissa is in the north-east of the country.President Jacob Zuma expressed his shock and dismay at the attack. He extended condolences to the families of the victims.“Terrorism in any form and from whichever quarter cannot be condoned. South Africa stands firmly with the international community in condemning all terrorism and stands in solidarity with Kenya,” he said.Zuma reiterated South Africa’s support for Kenya and the international community’s efforts aimed at peacekeeping, stability, democracy and nation-building in Somalia.Source: The Presidencylast_img read more

The Flashback Sequence Effects Tool Kit

first_imgDiffused GlowAs I noted in this article on diffusion filters, a diffused glow is a fantastic aesthetic that suggests a scene is taking place in the past. It mirrors an old technique when cinematographers would put netting behind the lens to smooth the skin of Hollywood starlets. It’s a subtle but effective technique. Since the glow creates an ethereal essence, it’s also an excellent way to indicate flashbacks, such as the scene below from Rocky V.You can very quickly create a diffused glow in any NLE or compositor by following these steps.Bring your footage into a new composition.Create a copy of your footage and place it on a new layer, directly above the original.Add a blur of 5-10 percent to the top layer.Change the blend mode of the top layer to lighten. Cross ProcessingCross processing footage to signify a flashback is a great approach. Cross processing involves lab technicians or photographers deliberately using the incorrect chemical solution for processing a film stock. As a result, the film would process with an unnatural color and with high contrast.You can see the effect put to good use in Tarantino’s Django Unchained.Don’t worry; you don’t have to rush out and buy film stock and chemicals to achieve this effect. You can easily pull this off with any color grading application. DaVinci Resolve guru Denver Riddle shows you how to achieve the look in the following tutorial. Color TintIf you look again at the example from Rocky V, you can see there’s also a cool tint to the image. This is another common effect you see in flashback sequences, especially procedural dramas like CSI. If you’re cutting back and forth between the present and the past at the same location, as in the Rocky V scene, this tint creates just enough differentiation between the timelines to prevent confusion.You can quickly add a color tint to an already-graded piece of footage by adding a solid color to your composition, changing the blend mode to overlay, then lowering the opacity down to 50-75 percent.AudioFlashbacks always include an audio effect to accompany visual cues. Typically, when storylines transition into flashbacks using the bloom or something similar, we also hear a swoosh (you can find a host of swoosh sound effects in the PremiumBeat SFX library). Secondly, when a flashback scene uncovers a hidden mystery, you will usually hear reverberated audio.You’ll need to choose the reverb effect that suits your project best, but a clever technique is to reverse the audio track, apply a reverb, then reverse the track once more so it reverts to normal. Then apply another reverb. The following clip demonstrates the before and after of this technique.https://www.premiumbeat.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Flashback-Audio.mp3There’s no one way to produce a flashback sequence. Filmmakers are creating new techniques all the time, and you can always choose not to use an effect at all. My favorite technique is the fluid distortion applied to the flashback/memory scene in Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows Part 2.What’s your favorite? Let me know in the comments.center_img This guide breaks down everything you need to know about producing and editing effective flashback sequences.Cover Image via Warner Brothers.Everyone knows a flashback when they see one — it’s a tried-and-true narrative tool. Really, there are two types of flashbacks. While their names come from the literary world, we can borrow them for film. There is an internal analepsis, which returns to a scene established in the narrative, and an external analepsis, which takes the story back to a time before the audience joined the narrative.Some critics believe an internal flashback undermines the strength of the story. The argument is that your film language hasn’t been clear enough if you need to return to an earlier scene to highlight something that the audience may have missed — unless this was intentional.If you prefer to tell your story with flashbacks, you need to know the different visual and audio cues that signify a flashback instead of a new scene in a linear progression.Let’s look at some of the effects you can use.Slower Shutter SpeedBefore we jump into the digital domain, let’s have a look at what you can do in-camera. By decreasing the shutter speed of your camera lower than the 180-degree standard shutter angle, each frame gets exposed a little bit longer. As a result, the footage becomes a myriad of fading blurs. This technique is perfect for dreamlike sequences — or when the character is intoxicated. It’s also great for short flashbacks.This will mean that you will have to film the scene twice if it’s an internal flashback. However, it’s a great technique if you want to show the scene from a unique perspective.Bloom TransitionThe bloom transition is a very popular technique used in TV, and it usually indicates a new scene, rather than a flashback to an established scene. This might occur when a suspect is telling the police how he committed his crime, or when a character is thinking about their past, and we transition to see that moment. For example, see the flashback below from The CW‘s Arrow, S01E01.This is the easiest and simplest effect to use, as you’re only applying the effect on a small area of the clip, rather than the entire flashback layer.Thankfully, there’s no need to follow an instruction list or video tutorial on how to create this effect, as the great Andrew Kramer from Video Copilot has already made a preset you can download for free. On the VideoCopilot blog, there’s also an instructional video how on to adjust the effect if you find yourself confused.White DissolveSimilar to the bloom transition, but less extravagant, involves dissolving in and out of a white solid. There are two ways you can do this.In your NLE, simply create a solid white layer, and place it above the two adjoining clips, two seconds of white solid on either side will work well.At the start point decrease the opacity to 0, set a keyframe, and set the opacity at 100 when it reaches the edit point. Then reduce the opacity back down to 0 to at end of the layer.Alternatively, if you are using an NLE like Premiere Pro CC, there is already a transition called Dip To White, which does the same thing, if not better.You can also improve this effect if you pan or tilt toward a highlight in the scene, such as a window or house fire. Both methods will produce a flashback transition like you see in the video below.last_img read more

Dark matter: Out with the WIMPs, in with the SIMPs?

first_imgLike cops tracking the wrong person, physicists seeking to identify dark matter—the mysterious stuff whose gravity appears to bind the galaxies—may have been stalking the wrong particle. In fact, a particle with some properties opposite to those of physicists’ current favorite dark matter candidate—the weakly interacting massive particle, or WIMP—would do just as good a job at explaining the stuff, a quartet of theorists says. Hypothetical strongly interacting massive particles—or SIMPs—would also better account for some astrophysical observations, they argue.”We’ve been searching for WIMPs for quite some time, but we haven’t found them yet, so I think it’s important to think outside the box,” says Yonit Hochberg, a theorist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California (UC), Berkeley, and an author of the new paper.Theorists dreamed up WIMPs 30 years ago to help explain why galaxies don’t just fly apart. The particles would have a mass between one and 1000 times that of a proton and, in addition to gravity, would interact with one another and with ordinary matter through only the weak nuclear force, one of two forces of nature that normally exert themselves only in the atomic nucleus.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The infant universe would have produced a huge number of WIMPs as subatomic particles crashed into one another. Some of those WIMPs would then disappear when two of them collided and annihilated each other to produce two ordinary particles. As the universe expanded, such collisions would become ever rarer and, given the strength of the weak force, just enough WIMPs would survive to provide the right amount of dark matter today—about five times that of ordinary matter. That coincidence, or “WIMP miracle,” has made WIMPs a favorite of theorists, even if experimenters have yet to spot them floating about.However, Hochberg and colleagues argue that dark matter could also consist of lighter particles that have a mass somewhere around one-tenth that of the proton and interact with one another—but not ordinary matter—very strongly. Such SIMPs would pull on one another almost as strongly as the quarks in a proton, which cling to each other so fiercely that it’s impossible to isolate a quark.SIMPs can also provide just the right amount of dark matter, assuming the theorists add a couple of wrinkles. The SIMPs must disappear primarily through collisions in which three SIMPs go in and only two SIMPs come out. These events must be more common than ones in which two SIMPs annihilate each other to produce two ordinary particles. Moreover, the theorists argue, SIMPs must interact with ordinary matter, although much more weakly than WIMPs. That’s because the three-to-two collisions would heat up the SIMPs if they could not interact and share heat with ordinary matter.That may seem like a lot to ask, but those conditions are easy to meet so long as the SIMPs aren’t too heavy, Hochberg says. So the WIMP miracle could easily be replaced with a SIMP miracle, as the team reports this month in Physical Review Letters.Moreover, the fact that SIMPs must interact with ordinary matter guarantees that, in principle, they should be detectable in some way, Hochberg says. Whereas physicists are now searching for signs of WIMPs colliding with massive atomic nuclei, researchers would probably have to look for SIMPs smacking into lighter electrons because the bantamweight particles would not pack enough punch to send a nucleus flying.Compared with WIMPy dark matter, SIMPy dark matter would also have another desirable property. As the universe evolved, dark matter coalesced into clumps, or halos, in which the galaxies then formed. But computer simulations suggest that dark matter that doesn’t interact with itself would form myriad little clumps that are very dense in the center. And little “dwarf galaxies” aren’t as abundant and the centers of galaxies aren’t as dense as the simulations suggest. But strongly interacting dark matter would smooth out the distribution of dark matter and solve those problems, Hochberg says. “This isn’t some independent thing that we’ve just forced into the model,” she says. “It just naturally happens.”The new analysis “has the flavor of the WIMP miracle, which is nice,” says Jonathan Feng, a theorist at UC Irvine who was not involved in the work. Feng says he’s been working on similar ideas and that the ability to reconcile the differences between dark matter simulations and the observed properties of galaxies makes strongly interacting dark matter attractive conceptually.However, he cautions, it may be possible that, feeble as they may be, the interactions between dark and ordinary matter might smooth out the dark matter distribution on their own. And Feng says he has some doubts about the claim that SIMPs must interact with ordinary matter strongly enough to be detected. So the SIMP probably won’t knock WIMP off its perch as the best guess for the dark matter particle just yet, Feng says: “At the moment, it’s not as well motivated as the WIMP, but it’s definitely worth exploring.”last_img read more

Jwala Gutta slams BAI president

first_imgHours after winning India’s first women’s badminton gold medal in Commonwealth Games, doubles specialist shuttler Jwala Gutta lashed out at Badminton Association of India (BAI) president V.K. Verma for not even congratulating the winning pair that comprised Ashwini Ponappa apart from her. Second seed Jwala and Ashwini had pulled up a historic victory stunning top seed Singaporeans Sari Shanti Mulia and Yao Lei in straight sets at Siri Fort Sports Complex on Thursday. Jwala paired with Ashwini after splitting with her long time partner Shruti Kurian during the Indian Open Grand Prix in Hyderabad. Jwala said that it was time for a huge shake-up in the association. In fact, she did not mince any words while making obvious reference to the BAI president. “Our president who was sitting and watched the match, did not come to congratulate us. I was not really happy with the way our association is working. I would like to change a lot of things in the coming years,” Jwala said.Jwala recently made headlines when media reports claimed that she was dating the Congress MP from Moradabad and former India cricket captain, Mohammad Azharuddin, after the latter decided to contest BAI election.”This medal will silent my critics. This is my answer to them to whatever happened. I am very happy and everyone who has negative thoughts about me, I would like to say just shut-up now,” Jwala said.  – With agency inputslast_img read more

Ajay Jayaram storms into Korea Open final

first_imgIndian shuttler Ajay Jayaram on Saturday continued his rampaging run at the Korea Open notching up a sensational straight-game upset victory over world No 7 Chou Tien Chen of Chinese Taipei to storm into the finals of the USD 600,000 Super Series event on Saturday.Long forgotten in the Indian badminton corridors, the 27-year-old Bangalore-based player on Sunday sent ripples in world badminton after prevailing over seventh seed Chen 21-19, 21-15 in a 43-minute mens singles semifinal match.Beaten twice this season to the same opponent at German Open and US Open, world No 32 Jayaram carried those scars as an armour into the match as he dominated the proceedings to eventually set up a summit clash with World No. 1 Chen Long of China.Jayaram possibly remembered his wins against Chen in Thailand and Japan in 2011 and 2013 when he took to the court as he opened up a 11-8 lead at one stage. The Taiwanese player turned the tables with a seven-point burst but the Indian was determined enough to stave off the challenge and soon pockted the game to lead 1-0.Brimming with confidence, Jayaram produced a more dominating show in the second game as he surged to 3-0 early on and then moved into the interval with a 11-7 lead. Chen once again clawed back at 12-12 and lead 15-14. However, Jayaram didnt allow him to come any closer as he reeled off six points to seal the match.Jayaram had reached the semi-finals of Malaysia Masters Grand Prix Gold, Swiss Open Grand Prix Gold and Russian Open Grand Prix this season. Among Indians, Kidambi Srikanth and Saina Nehwal won the mens and womens singles titles at the India Super Series this year.advertisementlast_img read more

IBASE: IoT gateways with TPM security

first_img Continue Reading Previous Arrow Electronics announces Artificial Intelligence Experience TourNext Würth: 3-axis acceleration sensor with preset functionalities IBASE announce the release of its AGS100T/AGS102T IoT gateways. Powered by Intel’s Apollo Lake Atom x7/x5 series, Pentium N4200, and Celeron N3350 SoCs, the systems enable seamless and secure data flow to the cloud in IoT-focused applications with enterprise-grade security, and easy manageability.The AGS100T/AGS102T compact fanless platforms offer maximum reliability and longevity support, featuring wide-range operating temperature of up to -40 ~ 70°C and dimensions of 160 x 110 x 44mm. Both models are suitable for space-constrained applications in harsh environments that require devices equipped with Trusted Platform Module technology.The rugged AGS100T features 4GB DDR3L-1866 DO-DIMM, a 64GB MLC industrial-grade mSATA SSD, dual display ports (DVI-I and DisplayPort), 4x USB 3.0, 2x GbE, 2x COM, a DC-in terminal block for 9V~36V input and over/under/reverse voltage protection. Expansion is available with a full-size Mini PCI-E, a 2230 M.2 E-Key socket for WLAN & BT, a 3042 M.2 B-Key socket for WWAN & SSD, an mSATA socket (Mini PCI-E), and a 2242 M.2 B-Key socket for mSATA SSD. The AGS102T has two extra serial ports for COM3/COM4 and GPIO 4-in & 4-out multi-purpose interface.Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: Boards & Modules last_img read more

Princess Dana Firas Of Jordan Named UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador

first_imgThe Director-General of UNESCO, Irina Bokova, designated Princess Dana Firas of Jordan as UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador in a ceremony at the Organization’s Headquarters last week.Princess Dana Firas of Jordan was designated UNESCO Goodwill AmbassadorCredit/Copyright: United NationsThe nomination comes in recognition of the Princess’s outstanding commitment to heritage protection and preservation as a pillar of sustainable development, her contribution to responsible tourism and community participation notably through her activities as President of the Petra National Trust and for her dedication to the ideals and aims of UNESCO.Her Royal Highness Princess Dana Firas of Jordan is the President of the Petra National Trust (PNT), the national nongovernmental organization dedicated to the protection of the heritage of the ancient Nabataean City in Southern Jordan that has been on the World Heritage List since 1985. The Princess also champions education, peace, human rights and sustainable development through activities involving the public and private sectors in Jordan and abroad.UNESCO Goodwill Ambassadors are an outstanding group of advocates who promote the ideals of the organization. They extend and amplify UNESCO’s work and mission and have generously accepted to use their talent and status to help focus the world’s attention on the work of UNESCO.last_img read more