Tax district may pay for new schools

first_imgPEARBLOSSOM – A proposed 800-home development in southeast Palmdale has Keppel Union School District officials readying to form a special tax district to help pay for the construction of schools. The 540-acre College Park project, which would include a Palmdale campus for Antelope Valley College, falls within Keppel’s boundaries, though it is inside Palmdale city limits. “We are trying to get ourselves in place,” Assistant Superintendent Steve Doyle said. “If this does, or when it goes through we are ready to go. One way to finance schools is potentially a community facilities district. We are setting up a contract to approve if we need to move forward. We are trying to position ourselves if we need to build a school.” The board at Thursday’s meeting approved giving district staff the authority to hire a consulting firm to help with the formation of a Mello-Roos community facilities district if the developer is agreeable. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “It’s always good to be proactive; this is really the initial stages of this project,” trustee Valorie Gorny said. “We are pleased to be on speaking terms with the developer. It looks like it will be an amicable relationship.” Originally proposed more than 10 years ago and approved by city officials in 1999, the College Park project appears to be moving forward after its acquisition by developer DR Horton, the nation’s largest home builder. The project is planned among rolling, brush-covered hills south of Barrel Springs Road, west of the Littlerock Dam. The college campus will be on nearly 70 acres of foothill land along 37th Street East. The project includes home lots ranging from 5,000 square feet to 40,000 square feet, an 18-hole golf course and a retail area. Keppel district officials have met with representatives of the developer, who expressed interest in cooperating with the district. “It appears there is some interest in funding schools through a local measure,” Superintendent Linda Wagner said. Mello-Roos districts allow developers to pass on to homeowners school-building fees rather than pay them before houses are built. Keppel currently charges a developer fee of $1.64 per square foot for residential development. The special tax districts are allowed to be formed under the Mello-Roos Act of 1982, named after two state legislators who wrote the law. It became law after 1978’s Proposition 13 capped property tax rates for Californians and diminished the ability of cities and districts to fund new roads, schools and infrastructure needed to support development. Developers are required to disclose the tax to home buyers, who sign a form indicating they were informed of the tax. Karen Maeshiro, (661) 267-5744 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Guilbert commits to Sacramento State

first_imgBut at the prompting of her … Malia Guilbert inked her name on a commitment letter to join the Sacramento State women’s rowing team during a signing ceremony Monday afternoon at Eureka High.The senior said she’s “excited” to begin her career as a collegiate rower.“I’ve never had such a big opportunity,” Guilbert said.The multi-sport athlete, aside from kayaking and partaking in other water-based activities during her free-time, said she has little prior experience formally rowing.last_img read more

Notes on fall fertilization: P and K

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Emerson Nafziger, University of Illinois Department of Crop SciencesWith harvest almost complete after another year with high to very high yields, it’s time to review some basics of fall fertilization. Neither fertilizer nor grain prices are historically high, so there’s reason to be aware of costs while making sure to cover the nutrient basics.P and KFall application of the dry fertilizer materials typically used to supply P and K to the next year’s (or next two years’) crops is normal practice, although there has been some moving of P and K applications to the spring. That’s not a problem with timing—even though P and K are relatively immobile in the soil, applying them as surface broadcast well in advance of crop emergence tends to work well. But fall soil conditions are often better for driving application equipment over fields, and many producers don’t want to add fertilizer application to the list of spring tasks. Most P and K fertilizers are broadcast, but some now apply these materials as bands placed into the soil, in some cases beneath where rows will be planted. Research has shown limited if any yield response to banding P and K compared to broadcasting, especially on productive soils with adequate P and K test levels already present. An advantage to placing P into the soil is that it is less prone to running off with rainfall. But this requires special equipment, and application of dry fertilizer in bands is substantially slower and more costly than broadcast application.While most P and K fertilizer is applied to soybean stubble in preparation for corn the next year and then soybean the year after that, we have seen some claims recently that soybean “needs its own P and K” and that it shouldn’t have to “settle” for the P and K “left over” from the corn crop. In all but very low-testing soils, where crop roots can have trouble reaching enough P and K as they grow into the soil, research has failed to show a benefit to annual applications of P and K, at least in soils such as those in Illinois. We know for certain that it costs more to apply nutrients every year than only once in two years. There have also been claims that soils tie up P and K over time after they are applied, such that “freshly-applied” nutrients are more available to plants. But applying amounts of P and K that crops remove tends to keep soil test levels fairly constant, suggesting that any tieup of P and K is not a permanent “loss” of these nutrients; as long as soil test levels are adequate, both crops get enough even if their roots don’t encounter fertilizer granules as they grow.A sound approach to determining rates for P and K is to add up the amount removed over the last two years (assuming a biennial application) and to apply that amount in preparation for the next two years. A year ago in a Bulletin article I reported the results from a recent NREC-funded grain nutrient sampling project in Illinois. We set grain removal levels as the values below which 75% of samples fell, so a little higher than the average amounts of nutrients we found in the grain samples. In some 2,100 grain samples of both corn and soybeans, we found removal levels of 0.37 lb. P2O5 and 0.24 lb. K2O per bushel of corn grain, and 0.75 lb. P2O5 and 1.17 lb. K2O per bushel of soybean grain. These are 10 to 15% lower than previous “book values” used in Illinois and many other states, and are in line with levels reported by Iowa State University scientists.Even with slightly lower P and K removal levels than we have used in the past, high yields mean removal of a lot of nutrients from fields. In a field that produced 240 bushels of corn in 2017 and 75 bushels of soybean in 2018, we calculate that harvested grain over the last two years removed 0.37 x 240 + 0.75 x 75 = 145 pounds P2O5 and 0.28 x 240 + 1.17 x 75 = 155 pounds K2O per acre. At current estimated retail prices of $520 per ton for DAP and $370 per ton for potash, the fertilizer to replace these amounts would cost about $123 per acre, not including the application cost.The still-sometimes-used “200-200” application (200 pounds DAP, or 92 pounds P2O5 and 200 pounds potash, or 120 pounds K2O) every other year was enough to keep soil test levels moving up when using such rates first became common. That’s because yield levels were much lower than in recent years; Illinois corn and soybean yields from 1961 through 1979 averaged 96 and 31 bushels per acre, respectively. Having applied rates exceed removal for decades in many fields is why soil test levels are as high as they are in such fields today. But using that amount of fertilizer at today’s yield levels will mean a steady drop in soil test values as more nutrients are removed than are replaced.Low crop prices often have some people wondering if they might cut back some on P and K in order to save money, presumably until crop prices are higher (or fertilizer prices are lower) in a year or two. Despite imaginative claims of “hidden hunger” and some overwrought interpretations of tissue testing levels, P and K deficiency symptoms are very rare in Illinois; we tend to see such symptoms mainly when soils dry out after planting and roots have trouble growing into soils enough to take up adequate P and K, even when soil test levels are high. Such symptoms are more common in compacted soils and in no-till fields, but we hardly ever see such symptoms when spring rainfall is normal.With adequate soil test levels of P and K in most fields and with crops that are good at extracting these nutrients, delaying the application of some or even all of the P or K for a year or even two years is likely to have little or no effect on the yield of the next crop(s). Still, nutrients removed by the most recent crops do need to be replaced, if not before the next crop or two then after that; higher soil test levels now provide more leeway. The real risk comes from allowing removal to exceed replacement over years, to the point where even good root systems can’t take up enough nutrients, and yields suffer. Reaching that point in most Illinois fields would take more than a year or two, but Illinois soils cannot generate enough P and K to meet the needs of high-yielding crops, so getting to that point is inevitable if the neglect continues. We can “kick the can (of nutrient replacement) down the road” for now, but that will mean having to replace ever-growing amounts of nutrients later, as grain, along with its nutrients, continues to come off the field every year.last_img read more

10 months agoPSG blow as Watford rule out Doucoure sale

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say PSG blow as Watford rule out Doucoure saleby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveWatford will block Abdoulaye Doucoure from joining PSG this month.PSG are keen on bringing the £50million-rated midfielder.However, the Evening Standard claim Watford will reject any offers during this transfer window.The Hornets are currently in ninth on the Premier League table and do not want to disrupt their progress by offloading one of their top players.When they do decide to sell Doucoure, Watford will stand to make a significant profit on the £8m they paid Rennes for him in 2015. last_img read more

UWI Partnering with Vision 2030 Jamaica for Research Days 2019

first_img It will get underway with the official opening ceremony on Wednesday, February 6, at which Finance and Public Service Minister, Dr. the Hon Nigel Clarke, is the slated keynote speaker. Story Highlights The University of the West Indies (UWI) is partnering with Vision 2030 Jamaica to stage The UWI’s Research Days 2019. The event is slated for the Mona Campus from February 6 to 8 under the theme: ‘Driving Research for Social and Economic Development’. The University of the West Indies (UWI) is partnering with Vision 2030 Jamaica to stage The UWI’s Research Days 2019.The event is slated for the Mona Campus from February 6 to 8 under the theme: ‘Driving Research for Social and Economic Development’.It will get underway with the official opening ceremony on Wednesday, February 6, at which Finance and Public Service Minister, Dr. the Hon Nigel Clarke, is the slated keynote speaker.While this year’s 20th staging will focus primarily on matters related to the long-term National Development Plan, several other critical areas will be addressed.These include the cannabis industry, mosquito-borne diseases and the Zones of Special Operations.The main attraction is the Research Village, featuring over 90 exhibitors with displays covering six sub-themes.These are: energy, the environment and resource-based industries; service and knowledge-based industries; education and culture; supporting industries, institutions and infrastructure; law, governance, security and society; pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, health and well-being.Addressing a Jamaica Information Service (JIS) Think Tank on Tuesday (Jan. 29), Convener of the activities, Professor Denise Eldemire-Shearer, said the theme aims to underscore the correlation between of Vision 2030 Jamaica and economic and social development.Professor Eldemire-Shearer, who is also UWI Director of Graduate Studies and Research, said the three-day event will afford persons the opportunity to see how important evidence-based research is to policy development, while highlighting The UWI’s work.Research Days will also feature special presentations from several notable Jamaicans.They include: former Director of the Tropical Metabolism Research Unit (TMRU), Professor Alan Jackson, who will present on the topic ‘Mission Accomplished’, which will focus on the eradication of child malnutrition in Jamaica; UWI Professor of Practice in International Economic Policy and Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Richard Bernal, who will deliver the Sue Cobb Lecture, focusing on the Jamaica/China Relationship; and Planning Institute of Jamaica Director General, Dr. Wayne Henry.Special areas will also be earmarked within the Village, featuring a Policy Wall which is a demonstration of research and how findings influence policy; 20-Year Retrospection; a Postgraduate Wall of Excellence; and a Reading Room.Additionally, for the first time, the work of Law Faculty students will be on display.Through its annual Research Days exposition, The UWI Mona showcases the latest academic explorations being done across its seven faculties.The event also afford stakeholders an opportunity to create partnerships to drive innovation in entrepreneurship, as The UWI’s research covers a number of areas including health, biotechnology, education, energy and science and technology.last_img read more

Toni Collette Helps Fight Hunger

first_imgEmmy and Golden Globe-winning actress, Toni Collette, and the international humanitarian organization, Concern Worldwide, are launching a campaign this fall to help make hunger history.Award-winning actress Toni Collette has joined the fight against extreme hunger with Concern Worldwide USCredit/Copyright: Peter McCabe/petermccabephotography.com. (PRNewsFoto/Concern Worldwide)“Food is such a basic, primal need,” said Ms. Collette. “I can’t believe that people die from not eating. It seems absurd that in this day and age, hunger should be an issue anywhere given we are able to help those who can’t feed themselves.”The campaign — Concern for Hunger — launched yesterday and supports Concern’s programs that treat and prevent malnutrition in 25 of the world’s poorest countries. People are invited to create their individual or team fundraising pages where they can ask their friends and family to sponsor them for skipping meals or to join them for a dinner party that raises funds to fight hunger. The fundraiser who raises the largest amount over $10,000 will have the opportunity to visit a Concern program overseas with a friend.“So often hunger feels like a problem that is so far away and you can’t have an effect, but you can,” said Ms. Collette. “If you’re able to donate even a little that eventually culminates in a lot and has a great effect on someone’s life and even in fact may save a life.”The world produces enough food to feed everyone, yet a child is lost every six seconds because of causes relating to malnutrition. Concern works on the front-lines of hunger in the world’s poorest countries through programs that not only provide comprehensive treatment for malnutrition, but also eliminate the root causes of hunger through investments in agriculture and food production.“Concern for Hunger is more than a campaign—it’s a movement,” said Siobhan Walsh, Executive Director for Concern Worldwide US. “By joining us, you are making a statement that you will not sit back and let malnutrition continue to needlessly claim and destroy lives. Together, we can reach those who do not have enough to eat—and get closer to making extreme hunger history.”You can hear more from Toni Collette on why she chose to join Concern in the fight against hunger in her PSA.Source:PR Newswirelast_img read more

For Prada black nylon is a safe haven in a storm

first_imgMILAN – With social and political crises unsettling the globe, Milan Fashion Week was all about slogans this season. “Time For Change” has been a particularly dominant catchphrase, one the fashion world can expect to see branded across sweatshirts, waistbands and accessories next fall and winter.The ubiquity of the expression does not necessarily denote consensus around the message it’s designed to convey. For some, it means back to roots. Others intend it as a call for respect.But the overall implication seems to be a rejection of the status quo, which really isn’t surprising in fashion.Naturally, Miuccia Prada is the outlier. Prada eschewed words because they have become empty. Where they appeared on prints in her new looks, words were meaningless.The second day of Milan Fashion Week of mostly menswear previews for Fall-Winter 2018-19 opened with youthful designers focused on urban street wear that tries to capture the zeitgeist of Millennial consumers.Here are some highlights from Sunday’s shows, including Prada, Dirk Bikkembergs, MSGM and DSquared2:___PRADA’S STRANGE PACKAGESIn challenging times, it is not unusual to seek the familiar. For Miuccia Prada, there is comfort in black nylon.The designer generously employs her favoured material in her pieces for the next cold weather season, padding them and applying them in protective layers.The boxy shapes for men and women appear to conceal the wearer in a unisex vein, but it is all for naught: Identity badges suggested a form of surveillance in the runway scenario. That sense of excessive control transforms into a political statement once the garments are on the rack and available to consumers.“I think we are in a moment when these aspects of control are very relevant,” the designer said after the show.Despite the collection’s utilitarian nature creating a sort of uniform of anoraks, jackets, caps, straight trousers and skirts, Prada said she also wanted to convey elegance.Beyond the dystopian looks, she included tourist-grade short-sleeved knits, or wild print short-shirt combos for men, and slit-skirt suits in bright tones paired with open-toe heels and long leather gloves for women.Prada enlisted architects to design new accessories, including a padded front pack that could stand in as a form of body amour, and a utility tool apron. Artists came up with the prints, including burning bananas and meaningless strings of words.“Now they no longer represent concepts, but they are pure decoration,” she said.The runway show was in a newly repurposed industrial building near the Prada Foundation contemporary art space. Unusually shaped and labeled crates were stacked along the walls. Prada promised they concealed strange things “that are preparing for some strange transformation.”The narrow aisles created a sense of disorientation as the fashionistas struggled to find their seats. That seemed an apt metaphor for the state of the world.“We don’t know where we are going, which is of course scary, of course interesting. Because I feel big changes are happening,” the designer said. “Some people say beauty will save the world. I think the world will be saved by intelligence, humanity and generosity. And possibly love. But of course the esthetic can help, a little help, if you can afford it.”___MSGM GOES TO BACK TO BASICSMilan university students served as both models and inspiration for the new MSGM collection. Taking their cue, brand founder Massimo Giorgetti found himself making an unexpected turn toward the dapper with hints of classic Milanese styling.“I studied the attitude of these guys, and it is less street wear than usual without losing modernity,” Giorgetti said. “Some are very, very elegant. The concept of elegant Milan, Italy, needs to be restudied also by a brand like mine. There’s an evolution going on.”The silhouette veered toward the everyday, neither too slim nor oversized. Looks included snazzy suits with zip-up jackets in pink or red worn with ties, as well as plaid trousers paired with cardigans and jumpsuits. Giorgetti collaborated with Eastpak on a series of graphic printed backpacks and travel bags.The designer emblazoned the collection with phrases of graffiti he collected from the desks, tables and restrooms of Milan’s universities. They included “Tempo per cambiare,” Italian for “Time for Change,” along with the Italian phonetic rendering of “I love you” as “hailoveiu.”Here, “Time for Change” clearly meant honouring roots and not looking abroad for validation.“They are very serious, very clever and very positive,” the designer said of the Milan students he worked with. “And they love their country.”___DUTCH MUSINGS AT DIRK BIKKEMBERGSDutch style, painting and design were all reflected in Lee Wood’s latest collection for Belgian label Dirk Bikkembergs.And in keeping with the down-to-earth Dutch nature, the collection was full of necessary items. A rain-resistant technical down coat was worn with tailored pants for an urban look merging sportswear with sartorial tradition.“A man needs to be authentic,” Woods said backstage. “We have a thousand things to do and life goes on. They are not heavy garments. They are basics, things we need.”The dark palette of navy blue, black and grey was inspired by paintings in Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum and included contrasts of deep cerulean blue, vermillion red and saffron yellow. The mixing of materials, such as in a nylon parka with a wool back panel and knit waistband, drew from a Rotterdam architectural institute. Straps on pockets echoed the ones on leather footwear.Wood said he was drawn to the Netherlands by coincidence. The models he was selecting came from there and the music a DJ played at casting sessions was Dutch.“I said I think I have to go, and visit this world,” he said.___WESTERN DOINGS AT DSQUARED2Model Bella Hadid bookended the runway show for DSquared2, the label of Canadian twins Dean and Dan Caten, opening as a cowgirl in plaid over denim and closing as a chic hippie in a tiered handkerchief gown worn with a big fur coat.DSquared2 adhered to the recent Milan trend of combining the men’s and women’s shows, scheduling theirs during the less hectic January round focusing on menswear.Red plaid emerged as the prevailing print in the Western-themed collection. The mood ranged from a little bit country to a little bit rockabilly to a little bit hippie chic. Oversized knitwear served as tableaus for western scenes.Any classic cowboy would feel at ease in the suede coat with sheepskin linings, while leather vests layered over flowing white peasant shirts for men or dresses for women gave an edge to the usual boho styling.The accessories of the season: big Double-D belt buckles and sequin neck scarves for men, or shiny sequin cuffs for him or her.____MEDITATIVE DESIGNS AT SARTORIAL MONKSabato Russo isn’t your usual designer making his Milan runway debut, supported by the Italian Fashion Chamber. He has decades of experience behind him, first as a model, and then working in the fashion industry in Japan and New York.“I was tired of making money and making clothes,” Russo said backstage. After taking time off to reflect, he returned to the business with his own brand, Sartorial Monk. In keeping with the name, his Milan debut collection can aptly be described as meditative.The looks appear simple to the eye, but are full of detail like Middle Eastern draping, that belie a complexity. The pieces seemed to envelop the models.The show opened in silence, with a model, the actress Violeta Sanchez, walking deliberately in high heels clicking on the runway, wearing a long camel coat over a printed silk velvet dress. The models that followed walked barefoot, giving a Zen sense to the simple flowing pieces: a slate double-breasted jacket over wide, pleated cotton trousers for him, or cropped tailored jackets worn with long clinging skirts for her. While the first half of the collection was more sartorial, the second part was more relaxed and loungey, with long, cozy knitwear and soft velvets.“It is simple, but it is never simple,” Russo said. “I think somebody who has personality can wear this. I don’t try to embellish.”___AMERICAN GOTHIC AT PALM ANGELSThe fashion crowd is this trusting. They filed up a narrow staircase in an apparently abandoned building, then down several levels, past the sort of laser lighting that jewel thieves navigate to their booty, and into a dark barren basement.It was there that Francesco Ragazzi unveiled his latest looks for Palm Angels. And the fashionistas nary batted an eye at the first look: a red plaid shirt with jeans and parka made alarming by the black facemask with nails sticking out. The accessory was calmly described as “studded baclavas” in the notes, but if it is any comfort, they are more likely a runway gimmick than a commercial proposition.Tartan and spikes clashed with Western themes and prints of the Grant Wood painting “American Gothic,” as punk clashed with Middle American values.“Palm Angels takes iconic American tropes and puts them out of context, fertilizes them with unexpected insertions, lets them grow and calls the result Neo Classic America,” the brand said in notes.last_img read more

US Ford to shut three factories stop making passenger cars in Russia

first_imgMoscow: US carmaker Ford will close three of the four factories of its Russian joint venture after deciding to stop making passenger cars in a country where car sales have slumped in recent years, the company said Wednesday. Ford said in a statement that it has signed a preliminary agreement with its local partner Sollers on “a significant restructuring of its… joint venture in Russia, focusing exclusively on growing its commercial vehicle business moving forward.” Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalThe joint venture “will discontinue its passenger vehicle portfolio in Russia to help deliver a more competitive and sustainably profitable business going forward,” Ford said. Ford, based in the US state of Michigan, said that by the end of June this year it will close its vehicle assembly plants in the northwestern city of Saint Petersburg and the city of Naberezhnye Chelny in Tatarstan, central Russia. It will also close an engine plant in Yelabuga in Tatarstan that opened in 2015. Sollers will have a 51 per cent stake in the restructured joint venture. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostCurrently the factories produce seven models including the Ford Transit van. Ford said that the “Russian passenger vehicle market has been under significant pressure in recent years, with recovery slower than expected and a shift to lower priced passenger vehicle segments.” The carmaker said that this led to “underutilisation” of factories and “inadequate returns on invested capital,” although sales of the Ford Transit continue to grow, with a 15 per cent share of the market segment. Following a period of growth and massive investment by global carmakers, Russia’s car market collapsed between 2013 and 2016, whiplashed by international sanctions over the Ukraine conflict and a crash in global oil prices. New car sales, a key indicator of consumer confidence, fell by more than half during that period. However sales of new cars in Russia rose in 2018 for a second year running, but slowed in February this year. ptilast_img read more

Aashiqui 2 clocks 6 years Shraddha sings Tum hi ho

first_imgMumbai: As ‘Aashiqui 2’ clocked six years of its release on Friday, actress Shraddha Kapoor sang one of the popular songs ‘Tum hi ho’ from the film for her fans. Shraddha took to Instagram to share a video in which she is seen singing soulful rendition of Arijit Singh’s song. Along with the video, she thanked fans by writing “I am what I am because of you all”. Directed by Mohit Suri, ‘Aashiqui 2’ also featured Aditya Roy Kapur. The film was based on the 1976 Hollywood film titled ‘A Star Is Born’. The film garnered positive responses from the audience especially for its songs, and even crossed Rs 100 crore mark. Celebrating six years of ‘Aashiqui 2’, Shradha, who played the role of Aarohi in the movie, even changed her Instagram username to Aarohi.last_img read more

Why has France given asylum to Interpols exchiefs wife China

first_imgBeijing: China on Wednesday objected to the French government granting asylum to the wife of former Chinese Interpol chief Meng Hongwei, who is currently on trial here for alleged corruption, saying that there is no political persecution in the case. Grace Meng, who had declined to return to China after her husband was arrested last year while on a visit here, alleged his political persecution by the Chinese government. Reacting to her asylum, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said, I don’t have the specifics. I can say that Meng was suspected of taking bribes and is being prosecuted by the Supreme People’s Procuratorate.” Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince Salman ‘snubbed’ Pak PM Imran, recalled his private jet from US: ReportThe case is ongoing and it is a normal criminal case. No political factor in it. There is no political persecution. The wife of Meng applied for asylum in France, it is abuse of French procedures. Hope China and France will hold proper and sound cooperation and deal with this case properly, he added. Meng, 65, once a rising political star of the ruling Communist Party of China (CPC) held the powerful post of vice-minister of public security before being appointed as the the country’s first official to head the Interpol. He was expelled from the CPC and removed as the head of Interpol for serious disciplinary violations and suspected of graft. Grace told media in France on Tuesday that she and her children have been granted political asylum by the French government.last_img read more