Leafs, Rebels pull off blockbuster KIJHL deal

first_img“It was a very difficult decision to give up Dallon but (Castlegar) wanted some leadership back and with Dallon’s experience in the league Castlegar wanted him badly,” Maida explained.“You really have to take a look at making sure a deal is going to work from a hockey point of view both on an off the ice,” Maida added. “To get two quality players like Wellman and Vlanich we had to give up fair value in return.”In Vlanich Nelson gets the Rebels second leading scorer both in the regular season and playoffs.Vlanich, from Trail and also sought out by the Beaver Valley Nitehawks, finished the season with a combined 28 goals in 48 games.Wellman, a native of Calgary, was Castlegar’s third leading scorer during the Rebels KIJHL run to the Cyclone Taylor Cup, finishing with 21 points after coming to the Sunflower City following a late season deal.Who knows if Leonard fits into the Cyclone Taylor season for the Leafs?The Kamloops backstop is pondering his future and may not play his final season, instead focusing on an electrical trade.The deals come less than three weeks before Nelson takes to the ice for training camp beginning August 30 at the NDCC Arena.Maida was still rustling the KIJHL bushes in an effort to bolster the roster even more before the Leafs begin a season that finishes with the Green and White hosting the Cyclone Taylor Cup, April 10-13 at the NDCC Arena.“We’re still negotiating with some teams,” he confessed. The BC Hockey roster deadline is more than six months away but already Leaf head coach Frank Maida has made more deals than Drew Carey on The Price is Right.Maida sent forwards Dallon Stoddart and James Sorrey along with D-man Seth Schmidt to Castlegar in exchange for sniper Jamie Vlanich and forward Travis Wellman.The Kootenay International Hockey League Murdoch Division deal comes on the heels of the Leafs acquiring the rights to netminder James Leonard from the Golden Rockets in exchange for future considerations.“Getting two experienced players (Wellman and Vlanich) who have been to the Cyclone Taylor (tournament) . . . two players I believe who can provide leadership being 20-year-olds, gives us a much deeper roster,” Maida told The Nelson Daily.Maida said the deal came together after he heard the Wellman and Vlanich requested a trade.However, the Nelson GM realized to get quality Nelson had to give up quality in the likes of Sorrey, Schmidt and Stoddart — the latter a Nelson Minor Hockey grad.last_img read more

Selkirk College Saints Add Leadership to Blueline

first_imgBruce-Fuoco’s strength is strong positional play and a great first pass. In the KIJHL regular season campaign, the defenceman scored eight goals and added 21 assists which was best amongst blueliners on the Thundercats. He finished his junior hockey career as the team’s captain.“We’re very excited for Jackson to have the opportunity to move on and play for a winning program at Selkirk College,” says Creston head coach and former Selkirk College bench boss Jeff Dubois.“As a person, he’s one of the best guys I’ve worked with. His commitment level to his team and teammates are tremendous, and he brings a great attitude to the rink every day. On the ice he’s mobile, skilled, and he can contribute in all three zones. He’s earned this commitment with an incredible amount of hard work and the Thunder Cats wish him all the best in the future.”Prior to playing in the KIJHL, Bruce-Fuoco spent time in the Central Canadian Hockey League, a Junior A league out of eastern Ontario.Last season the Selkirk College Saints captured their fourth straight BCIHL crown when they defeated the Trinity Western University Spartans in the league’s championship series before a packed house at the Castlegar & District Community Complex.Two key members of last year’s blueline brigade have graduated — captain Tanner Lenting and Arie Postmus — but Bruce-Fuoco joins a Saints defence unit bursting with talent.The BCIHL season will get underway in September where the Saints start pursuit of their fifth title. The four-time defending British Columbia Intercollegiate Hockey League (BCIHL) champion Selkirk College Saints are building towards the upcoming season with the signing of Jackson Bruce-Fuoco.An Ontario native, Bruce-Fuoco has committed for the 2016-2017 season and beyond. A skilled two-way defenseman that possess exceptional leadership, Bruce-Fuoco played for the Creston Valley Thunder Cats of the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League (KIJHL) in the 2015-2016 season.”We are very happy to have Jackson join our program for the 2016-17 season,” says Selkirk College Saints head coach Brent Heaven.“I was able to see Jackson play quite a bit over his last season in Creston and believe he has all the tools necessary to be a contributor at the BCIHL level.”last_img read more

Neptunes finish strong at Summer Swim Championships

first_img Division 8 girls fifthDue to the poor air quality from wildfires in the Thompson region, the BCSSA secured indoor space for swimmers to rest in between races at the provincial event. Division 2 girls eighth Cynthia Pfeiffer second in 100 backstroke. Division 5 boys fifth Sage Cowan, fifth-place finish 200-meter individual medley, sixth place 100-meter butterfly, eighth place finish 100-meter freestyle. Division 2 boys eighth Division 5 girls fifth Division 3 girls eighth “Along with (a lot of) highlights, we also had many swimmers place top 16 in their respected events,” said Neptune coach Sarah Broen.Some of the Neptune results included: Nelson Neptune swimmers saw an opportunity to test their skills against the best in the province at the BC Summer Swim Association Championships this past weekend at the Canada Games Aquatic Centre in Kamloops.Neptunes, which compete in the Kootenay Summer Swim Association against teams from Trail, Castlegar, Grand Forks, Kimberley, Creston and Colville, Wash., sent a strong group of swimmers who qualified at the Kootenay Regional meet. Sarah Broen, eighth finish 100-meter butterfly, fourth 100-meter backstroke. Division 3 boys seventh Madeline Holitzki, sixth-place finish100-meter breaststroke.Regional Relay Team Results: Division 6 boys sixth Division 4 girls fifth Division 7 girls fourth Lachlan Bibby-Fox sixth-place finish 100-meter individual medley, second place 50-meter breaststroke.last_img read more

Consumer debt falls sharply

first_img While retailers are reporting a mixed start to the holiday shopping season, analysts cautioned against reading too much into the one-month falloff in consumer credit. “This is a pay back for the aggressive discounts consumers were offered to buy cars during the summer,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Economy.com. On Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial average fell 45.95 points to finish the day at 10,810.91. Americans are shouldering record-high levels of consumer debt and personal savings rates have fallen to record lows, but analysts said consumer spending, which accounts for two-thirds of the total economy, should continue rising even if the pace slows a bit. “I have full faith in the ability of the American consumer to keep spending,” said David Wyss, chief economist at Standard & Poor’s in New York. The 4 percent drop in consumer credit followed a 2.2 percent increase in September while the 4.9 percent drop in auto loans and other non-revolving credit followed a 1.1 percent decline in September. These loans had shot up by 6.2 percent in August as consumers responded to attractive incentive offers. On the Net: Consumer credit report: www.federalreserve.gov 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WASHINGTON – Consumer borrowing plunged at a record annual rate of $7.2 billion in October, reflecting a big drop in auto loans. The Federal Reserve reported Wednesday that the decline was the biggest amount ever in dollar terms, and included a record drop of $5.6 billion rate of decline in the category that includes car loans. The dollar declines translated into a drop of 4 percent in overall borrowing, the biggest percentage setback in nearly 15 years, and a decline of 4.9 percent in the category that includes auto loans, the biggest percentage drop in 13 years. The big drop took analysts by surprise. They had been expecting that consumer spending would rise at an annual rate of $5 billion in October. last_img read more

Peace: African Realities and Perspectives

first_imgMahajan presents us with what is going right in Africa and builds a strong case for the continent as an exciting destination for foreign investment – even in these turbulent times. Collier helps us understand the traps than are keeping millions of Africans mired in poverty and which are hampering from the continent achieving the potential Mahajan so correctly identifies. Mahajan argues that Africa, with more than 900 million consumers, is on the world fastest growing markets. He invites us to understand that Africa, taken as a whole, has a Gross National Income of around 980 billion, making it the tenth largest economy in the world ahead three of the four BRIC economies – Brazil, Russia and India. It’s ahead of India on a GNI per capita basis as well. In fact, six Africa countries boast a higher GNI per capita than China. “There will soon be a billion consumers on the continent of Africa,” Mahajan writes. “Every day, they need to eat, they need shelter. They want education for their children. They would like to have soaps to wash their clothes. They desire cell phones, metal roofs for their homes, televisions, music, computers, movies, bicycles, cosmetics, medicines, cars and loans to start businesses.” A lot of people think Africa’s wealth resides in oil and diamonds . If we’re talking about oil and diamonds as primary exports commodities, we’re talking about one the factors that Collier sees trapping much of Africa in poverty. But Mahajan sees the wealth of Africa is other kinds of oil and diamonds. He cites the case of Bidco in Kenya will has built a $160 million business selling cooking oil, detergent and other products to low income customers throughout East Africa. As for diamonds, he identifies the so-called Black Diamonds of South Africa, as the University of Cape Town’s Unilever Institute called them. They are members of South Africa’s rapidly emerging black class, which, unleashed by the end of apartheid, has been growing at a rate of around 30 per cent a year. They are not a uniquely South African phenomenon. Mahajan estimates that there are aound 400 million people in the middle segment of the overall African market. This help account for the fact that while the four largest African companies are still in the resources business, firms in other sectors are gaining an ever larger representation in the top 20. These include makers of consumer goods like SABMiller, telecoms companies like MTN, Orascom and Telkom SA, and banks like Standard, Absa and FirstRand. Mahajan isn’t the only one telling this story. On September 2, the Wall Street Journal ran an article headlined “Investors bet Africa stocks are new tigers”. It gave the example of the Ghana Stock Exchange All-Share Index which, at the point, had appreciated by 63 per cent over the preceding nine months while on Wall Street the S&P 500 was down 13 percent over the same period (and has since swooned even more dramatically). The Journal had a very telling quote for Charl Malan, the head of African research for Van Eck Global. African stocks, he said, were not a play on commodity prices any more. “If you think the commodities cycle is unsustainable, then why is Africa sustainable? Because this time, there’s a whole range of growth initiatives put into place by various African leaders.” What helped inspire the Wall Street Journal story was an article by David Nellor, a senior adviser in the International Monetary Fund’s Africa Department. Comparing their performance with the of the so-called Asian Tigers as they readied for take-off in 1980, Nellor concluded that “several African countries…are promising candidates to become part of a second generations of emerging market countries.” “The same crucial development,” Nellor continued, “are taking place in parts of sub-Saharan Africa today – growth is taking off, the private sector is the key driver of that growth and financial markets are opening up. The search for yield…has encouraged investors to expand their horizons.” In a separate study, published last month, the IMF looked at what it called the “Great Sub-Saharan Africa Growth Take-off”. If found that the fast growers were a diverse group, including resource rich and landlocked countries as well as resource poor countries that have not had large gains in their terms of trade. The IMF also found that while most African countries were going to having difficulty meeting the Millennium Development Goal by the 2015 target date, growth was benefiting the poor who were seeing real rises in their incomes. So there is a new and very hopeful story being told about Africa. Tragically, the old story, the story of conflict, atrocities and refugees, continues to be told as well. Right now the focus is on the eastern corner of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The Darfur situation in Sudan continues to be a grave concern as does Uganda’s unfinished war with the Lord’s Resistance Army. This is where Collier’s findings become interesting. As the name of his book indicates, his focus in the poorest one billion people on the planet. They are concentrated in Africa and Central Asia, and they are the least likely to touched by the growth story we’ve been looking at so far. The countries they live in are caught in one or more of a set of often interrelated traps which include civil war, a dependence on the extraction and export of natural resources and bad governance. Collier begins a sobering statistic: 73 per people in the bottom billion live in societies that have recently been recently been through a civil war or have recently been through one. He then goes on to demonstrate, empirically, the intimate relationship between poverty and conflict and how they feed each other. One of his key findings is that Africa is not uniquely conflict prone. Rather, it became more prone to conflict when as its economic performance deteriorated. In other words, causation has flowed from poverty to conflict not vice versa. The trouble is that once a civil war has erupted, it tends to have a highly destructive impact on the economy, thereby sowing the seeds for further conflict. The experience of having been through a civil war roughly doubles the risk of another conflict, Collier writes. And even if further conflict can be avoided, undoing the economic consequences can be very difficult. Collier believes that DRC will need 50 years of peace at its present growth rate to get back to 1960 income levels. Nonetheless, growth does directly help reduce the risk of civil by raising incomes and making it easier for countries to diversify their exports. Fragile states that rely on the export of one or two high value commodities are always at high risk of conflict resulting from competition to control the rents from those commodities. The lesson to be drawn is that anyone who is serious about seeing Africa meet the potential Mahajan describes in Africa Rising must, in addition to be serious about pro-growth economic policies, also be serious about conflict resolution and prevention. This is why South Africa has been more than happy to play it part in working with regional partners and the African Union for peace throughout the continent, from the DRC to the Great Lakes to Darfur to the Comoros to Cote D’Ivoire to our neighbor Zimbabwe. To achieve the African Renaissance we all dream of, we need to end cycles of violence and economic immiseration and prevent new ones from starting. We bring to the table our own experience in bringing peace and democracy to a land that was torn apart for generations by racial oppression. Among the most important of those lessons is for peace to be sustainable, all parties must feel they own it and no one should leave the table thinking that that they were forced to accept terms by powers outside the negotiating room. This takes a lot of patience, creativity and a capacity for empathy, but the election on April 28, 2004, and the adoption of our new constitution two years later, showed it can be done. We also know, from bitter ongoing experience, about how hard it is to escape the continuing echoes of conflict. There severest challenges we face today, from crime to skills shortages to HIV/AIDS, owe their origins to what apartheid and our struggle to end it did to the fabric of our society. Above all, we understand that if our so-called miracle is to last, it must be underpinned by economic policies that promote growth and equity, help generate the resources needed to roll the legacies of our history and enable us to play our part in the great Africa Rising story.last_img read more

Defence sting the Scorpions in final

first_imgBy BEN HARRISA tremendous defensive effort from Queensland Stingrays ensured the men’s Elite Eight trophy remained in the northern state for another year.Playing their first men’s Elite Eight final, the Stingrays showed no sign of nerves to shut out the 2011 champions New South Wales Scorpions 5-2 in front of a huge crowd at the C.ex Coffs International Stadium.The Scorpions were a shadow of the team that had played in the earlier days of the competition.Their attack was shut down by a superb Stingrays defensive outfit.“It was our basis of the whole campaign was to back our line D [defence]. And it worked,” Stingrays captain Nathan Jones said.Defence played a huge part in the first half as the score at the break was 1-nil to the Stingrays.The lone touchdown came from a great move, which saw Graeme Clancy pass to Kristopher McMurdy who then turned it inside to Michael Singh.The second half was a complete opposite to the first.Before the fans could return to their seats after half-time, the Stingrays extended their lead to three touchdowns thanks to Peter Norman and Tristan Wagg.Midway through the second half, James de Veer showed a great pair of hands to knock a Norman long ball in the air and then regathered to plant it down over the line.Two minutes later Jordan Watts made it 5-0 and it looked like the Scorpions could end the match with a doughnut next to their name.But they managed to score two consolation touchdowns to Jordan Horo and Cain Rangi.The Stingrays’ victory in the men’s and the Queensland Chiefs’ win in the women’s division meant Queensland won both Elite Eight divisions.“There is a bit of rivalry [with New South Wales] but we also play the Queensland boys all the time and we like beating them. We come down here and they’ve [Scorpions] got some good players. We just love winning.”Player of the final was Stingrays’ Adam Pryde and for the third time Sam Brisby was named player of the series.QUEENSLAND STINGRAYS 5 (Jordan Watts, Michael Singh, Peter Norman, Tristan Wagg, James de Veer touchdowns) def NEW SOUTH WALES SCORPIONS 2 (Jordan Horo, Cain Rangi touchdowns).Related LinksMen’s Elite Eightlast_img read more

Maryland Commit Diamond Stone Tried To Party At Wisconsin-Milwaukee This Weekend, And Things Didn’t Go Well

first_imgMilwaukee product Diamond Stone, a five-star center and the No. 5 overall player in the 2015 recruiting class, committed to Maryland over his home-state Badgers back in late March, and Wisconsinites are not happy about it. According to multiple tweets, Stone tried to go to Madison UW-Milwaukee to party this weekend, and was not treated well by the spurned fans.Just saw Diamond Stone get kicked out of a party. Sucks to suck man— Blake Laufenberg (@BlakeLaufenberg) April 26, 2015Well I was the bouncer at a party and kicked diamond stone out so I’m feeling pretty accomplished— Payton teDuits (@Paytonteduits) April 26, 2015stone1Diamond stone just got kicked out of this party lmfao— Jordyn Jablonski (@Jblonks_) April 26, 2015Diamond Stone got kicked out of a party we were at.— Bucks in 7 (Shaq) (@AGruett32) April 26, 2015No one likes Diamond Stone— Blake Laufenberg (@BlakeLaufenberg) April 26, 2015Diamond stone came to UWM last night and he got kicked out of every party he went tried to go to— Alex Peterson (@APeterson32) April 26, 2015Stone probably shouldn’t be too surprised, but he’ll also have plenty of party opportunities when he makes it down to College Park. [The Victory Lap]last_img read more

China rejects US hacking claims before TrumpXi meeting

first_imgBEIJING — China’s government has rejected a U.S. report that accuses Beijing of stepping up efforts to steal technology ahead of a meeting between Presidents Donald Trump and Xi Jinping.The Commerce Ministry on Thursday accused Washington of destroying trade relations and rejected the U.S. Trade Representative’s report as “groundless accusations.”Both sides have raised tariffs on billions of dollars of each other’s goods in a fight over U.S. complaints that Beijing steals or pressures companies to hand over technology.The USTR report said computer hacking attacks traced to China and aimed at stealing American technology have increased this year.Trump and Xi are due to meet this month in Buenos Aires during a gathering of the Group of 20 major economies.The Associated Presslast_img read more

US Ford to shut three factories stop making passenger cars in Russia

first_imgMoscow: US carmaker Ford will close three of the four factories of its Russian joint venture after deciding to stop making passenger cars in a country where car sales have slumped in recent years, the company said Wednesday. Ford said in a statement that it has signed a preliminary agreement with its local partner Sollers on “a significant restructuring of its… joint venture in Russia, focusing exclusively on growing its commercial vehicle business moving forward.” Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalThe joint venture “will discontinue its passenger vehicle portfolio in Russia to help deliver a more competitive and sustainably profitable business going forward,” Ford said. Ford, based in the US state of Michigan, said that by the end of June this year it will close its vehicle assembly plants in the northwestern city of Saint Petersburg and the city of Naberezhnye Chelny in Tatarstan, central Russia. It will also close an engine plant in Yelabuga in Tatarstan that opened in 2015. Sollers will have a 51 per cent stake in the restructured joint venture. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostCurrently the factories produce seven models including the Ford Transit van. Ford said that the “Russian passenger vehicle market has been under significant pressure in recent years, with recovery slower than expected and a shift to lower priced passenger vehicle segments.” The carmaker said that this led to “underutilisation” of factories and “inadequate returns on invested capital,” although sales of the Ford Transit continue to grow, with a 15 per cent share of the market segment. Following a period of growth and massive investment by global carmakers, Russia’s car market collapsed between 2013 and 2016, whiplashed by international sanctions over the Ukraine conflict and a crash in global oil prices. New car sales, a key indicator of consumer confidence, fell by more than half during that period. However sales of new cars in Russia rose in 2018 for a second year running, but slowed in February this year. ptilast_img read more